Responsabilit socitale et dveloppement durable

French

Papers

Corporate Social Responsibility, Ownership Structure, and Political Interference: Evidence from China

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Abstract  
Prior research suggests that ownership structure is associated to corporate social responsibility (CSR) in developed countries. This article examines whether and how ownership structure affects CSR in emerging markets using Chinese firms’ social responsibility ranking. Our empirical evidences show that for non-state-owned firms, corporate ownership dispersion is positively associated to CSR. However, for state-owned firms, whose controlling shareholder is the state, this relation is reversed. We attribute the reversed relationship to political interferences and further test this hypothesis by demonstrating that regional economic development is negatively related to CSR for state-owned firms due to decreased political interference in more developed areas. This study is the first to directly examine the relationship between the dispersion of corporate ownership and CSR in emerging markets, and our results depict that it is important to consider ownership type in assessing CSR in emerging market where state ownership is still prevalent such as China. The results also reveal that firm size, profitability, employee power, leverage, and growth opportunity affect CSR in China.

  • Content Type Journal Article
  • DOI 10.1007/s10551-010-0488-z
  • Authors
    • Wenjing Li, Jinan University School of Management Guangzhou 510632 China
    • Ran Zhang, Peking University Guanghua School of Management Beijing China


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Last Updated on Monday, 21 February 2011 12:45

 

The Stakeholder Approach: A Sustainability Perspective

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Abstract   This article considers the stakeholder approach (SHA) to organisational management through the lens of what it means for humans to live sustainably on the Earth (that is, for there to be a sustainable world). In particular, the article considers if the SHA, as it is presented in mainstream academic and management literature, is supportive of corporate practices that advance the achievement of a sustainable world. The analysis shows the SHA to have significant failings in this regard when viewed against key sustainable world criteria, with issues of concern evident from the normative core of the SHA through to is practical application in the management setting.

  • Content Type Journal Article
  • DOI 10.1007/s10551-010-0538-6
  • Authors
    • Don Clifton, University of South Australia Adelaide SA Australia
    • Azlan Amran, Universiti Sains Malaysia Penang Malaysia


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Last Updated on Wednesday, 23 February 2011 09:25

 

Social Sustainability in Selecting Emerging Economy Suppliers

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Abstract  
Despite the growing public awareness of social sustainability issues, little is known about what drives firms to emphasize social criteria in their supplier management practices and what the precise benefits of such efforts are. This is especially true for relationships with international suppliers from the world’s emerging economies in Asia, Latin America, and Eastern Europe. Building on stakeholder theory, we address the issue by examining how pressures from customers, the government, and employees as primary constituencies of the firm determine the extent to which firms consider social aspects in the selection of emerging economy suppliers. Further, we analyze how such socially sustainable supplier selection relates to the capabilities of the firm’s suppliers, its market reputation, and the learning in its supply management organization. We test the developed research framework empirically using data from 244 U.S. and German corporations. Our findings, consistent with our hypothesized model, suggest that middle-level supply managers as internal stakeholders play a major driving role for firms’ socially sustainable supplier selection, and that strong positive links exist between that selection and the investigated outcomes.

  • Content Type Journal Article
  • DOI 10.1007/s10551-010-0537-7
  • Authors
    • Matthias Ehrgott, WHU – Otto Beisheim School of Management Vallendar Germany
    • Felix Reimann, WHU – Otto Beisheim School of Management Vallendar Germany
    • Lutz Kaufmann, WHU – Otto Beisheim School of Management Vallendar Germany
    • Craig R. Carter, Arizona State University Tempe AZ U.S.A.


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Last Updated on Monday, 21 February 2011 12:46

 

Detecting Supply Chain Innovation Potential for Sustainable Development

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Abstract  
In a world of limited resources, it could be argued that companies that aspire to be good corporate citizens need to focus on making best use of resources. User value and environmental harm are created in supply chains and it could therefore be argued that company business ethics should be extended from the company to the entire value chain from the first supplier to the last customer. Starting with a delineation of the linkages between business ethics, corporate sustainability, and the stakeholder concept, this article argues that supply chains generally have a great innovation potential for sustainable development. This potential could be highlighted with system thinking and the use of change management knowledge, promoting not only innovations within technology but also within organizational improvement. We propose process models and performance indicators as means of highlighting improvement potential and thus breaking down normative business ethics’ requirements to an opertionalizable corporate level: Good business ethics should focus on maximizing stakeholder value in relation to harm done. Our results indicate that focusing on supply chains reveals previously unknown innovation potential that seems to be related to limited system understanding. The assumption is that increased visibility of opportunities will act as a driver for change. Results also highlight the importance of focusing on sustainability effects of the core business and clearly relating value created to harm done.

  • Content Type Journal Article
  • DOI 10.1007/s10551-010-0516-z
  • Authors
    • Raine Isaksson, Gotland University Cramérgatan 3 Visby Sweden
    • Peter Johansson, Gotland University Cramérgatan 3 Visby Sweden
    • Klaus Fischer, Gotland University Cramérgatan 3 Visby Sweden


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Last Updated on Monday, 21 February 2011 12:46

 

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